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Newborn Sleep | Sweet Dreams | giggle Blogs

newborn sleep

April 6, 2011

Further Support for Back Sleepers

A study published on February 28th, 2011 in the online version of Pediatrics Journal adds weight to the recommendation that babies be laid to sleep on their backs.  The study looked at tissue oxygenation in babies who sleep on their backs, as compared to babies who sleep prone.

The study concluded, “In healthy infants cerebral oxygenation is reduced during sleep in the prone position. This reduction may underpin the reduced arousability from sleep exhibited by healthy infants who sleep prone, a finding that provides new insight into potential risks of prone sleeping and mechanisms of sudden infant death syndrome.”

In addition to reduced oxygenation, sleeping prone also increases a babies risk of suffocation, overheating and re-breathing in exhaled air, which is lower in oxygen.  Each of these is an important risk factor to weigh when laying your baby down to sleep.

I regularly consult with clients who claim that their babies sleep better in the prone position, which is often true, however the risks associated with sleeping in this position are significant and should outweigh the temporary benefits of longer stretches of uninterrupted sleep.  Most full-term babies are able to sleep soundly on their backs by 16 weeks of age and the earlier they learn to sleep on their backs, the better they sleep that way.  A quick tip for babies who awaken frequently on their backs is to swaddle them snugly to minimize the startle reflex that often awakens babies sleeping on their backs.

October 28, 2010

sibling preparation + sleep

I recently facilitated a webinar on sibling preparation and fielded many questions about sleep. Contrary to what you might think, most questions were about the big sibling’s sleep, not the newborn!

The birth or adoption of another child definitely brings about many big transitions and adjustments for families.  At the heart of many of those changes is sleep.  And while parents often worry about keeping up with a newborn and a toddler/preschooler while they are getting such little sleep themselves — the biggest worry is the disruption to their oldest child(ren)’s sleep habits.

Here are a few helpful guidelines for dealing with this new, big change.

1. If your older child is a toddler under three-years-old, keep him or her in their crib. A crib is a safe, predictable, comforting place for your child.  Moving to a bed will bring about unnecessary anxiety and uncertainty at a time when there is plenty of change to go around.  This may mean needing to purchase or borrow another crib for your baby.

2. If your older child is nearly three-years old or simply too big for a crib, then I recommend moving your child to a big bed either well in advance of the birth of the baby (say three months or so) or waiting until a few months after the birth of the baby. Ideally the latter as many children show signs of regression when a baby enters the scene.  Staying in a crib allows them to regress and be more baby-like at night with all their familiar comforts and security, while having to adjust to this new role as “big” brother or sister during the day.  After a few months of having the baby at home, things will settle down and become more routine and that transition will be easier for everyone.

3. If your older child starts to awaken frequently at night, have your spouse/partner sleep in the room with your child (separate bed) for a week while s/he makes the transition. The reassurance that will come from having someone in the room can make a huge difference and will often mean that your older child is able to continue sleeping well at night.

July 7, 2010

Welcome to Sleepy Time!

Hello! I am so excited to be here blogging on the topic of sleep.  As a sleep consultant and mother of two young daughters, ages 3.5 and 11 months, I am very familiar with the many joys of parenthood, as well as the total exhaustion that is often the hallmark of the early weeks and months with a newborn or the day-to-day challenges with a sleep-resistant child.  I intend to draw on my everyday experiences from home and work to bring you tips, advice and the latest research to help all of you have well rested families.

How one goes about getting their child to sleep well is often a divisive and controversial subject.  My goal is to offer scientifically based evidence and tips so that each of you can make the best choices for your children and families.  I truly believe that there really is no one right way to nurture healthy sleep habits, though there are common threads that can take us all to the same restful place. Ah, doesn’t that sound good?!

Sweet dreams!